Fedora Day Four: Performance

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So I’m now a few days into my time with Fedora, and things are going well so far. The machine is all up and running, and I’m back at my keyboard working away. We now know how to make Fedora look good, but how well does it perform in practice? Let’s take a look…

System resources

As many people reading this will already know, neither Fedora, or Gnome-Shell are ‘light’ systems. But I don’t really understand why so many people within the Linux community love these light systems so much. I mean, a semi-modern machine now will have a dual-core CPU and at least 4GB of RAM. Not to mention the fact that SSD’s are becoming commonplace on machines now.

On my machine I currently have Chrome with six tabs open, thunderbird, and a couple of background apps like Copy. The RAM usage on my machine is sitting at around 1.6GB now this may sound a lot, but if you think about it, my machine has 6GB of RAM, and even my “really old” desktop upstairs has 2GB of RAM. So there will still be 25% of my RAM left over, even on my desktop.

My dual-core AMD A6 CPU is also idling at around 20-25% usage.So again, there is plenty left in reserve for other things. With nothing open, i.e. just sat on my desktop, Fedora is using around 800MB of RAM and around 15% of the CPU.

System Monitor_001Moving around Fedora

Moving my way around Fedora is done in a snap, but a lot of that may be thanks to the SSD that I have in my machine. The system does seem to boot slower than Ubuntu, taking around 15-20 seconds compared to the rough 10-15 seconds in Ubuntu but that’s not a big deal really when actually using the system is seems so much quicker. The most noticeable being the activities menu compared to the Unity dash. To open and navigate around the activities menu just seems generally quicker to move around.

Overall the performance of Fedora is pretty good, it’s nothing ground breaking but it’s certainly no slouch and the snappier feeling to the activities menu does give it a distinct advantage over Ubuntu’s Unity. However, I do miss the HUD from Unity.

Day One | Day Two | Day Three | Day Four | Final Day

Fedora Day Four: Performance
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